Holy Trinity

The churches in the benefice are spread in age from 11th Century to mid Victorian times and just visiting these beautiful places of worship is a delight in itself.

The beautiful parish church of Holy Trinity is hidden away up Blendworth Lane from Horndean centre. It is open every day from 7 am until 6 pm (4 pm in winter). The visitors’ book has many complimentary comments “lovely church, so pleased to find it open” which attest to the welcome and wellbeing found by visitors.

We have a vigorous, well supported four-part harmony mixed choir which regularly sings anthems and leads the congregation in the usual parts of the service. They are led by an enthusiastic Director of Music who is supported by two gifted organists playing the two-manual pipe organ.

Community

A great community event was re-established in 2016 by Holy Trinity’s PCC, when the Blendworth Village Fete, to celebrate Her Majesty the Queen’s 90th Birthday, opened in the grounds of Blendworth House. This is now an annual event and the fete has received a warm response from local people.

Our ministry and lay teams are involved with Horndean Infant and Junior schools supporting the Junior School’s Spirituality Day and providing a Foundation Governor. Holy Trinity regularly takes part in services in the village square on occasions such as Remembrance Sunday and the annual Carol Service.

History

Holy Trinity is nearly 170 years old, and therefore as churches go, quite a modern building.  The church is the successor to at least two former buildings which existed in Old Blendworth.  The present church was designed by WG & E Habershon with flint walls, steeply pitched roofs and a broached spire above the tower.  The foundation stone was laid in 1851, and the consecration of the church was in 1852.  The original choir vestry was built in 1904 by public subscription, and was extended in 1979 with the addition of the flat roof vestry.

Although past buildings may be gone, records dating from 1303 are still held.  Among them is a list of Rectors beginning with Adam de Boudone in the south aisle.  The registers date from 1586.

The Reredos with its carved canopy of alabaster enclosing three mosaic panels, the centre one bearing a St Andrew’s cross with the letters Alpha and Omega, the left St Peter, and the right St Paul, makes an imposing background for the Altar.

In the church there is an east window of three lights representing St Timothy, St Stephen and St Titus, which was given as a memorial.  Others include one window to commemorate a chorister who died in 1911 at the age of 17.  There are further stained glass windows, two to the south of the nave, one to the north, adjacent to the pulpit, and a substantial west window depicting the ‘Walking on the Water’.  This was damaged by a land mine in the Second World War, and was repaired by the artist Vanessa Cutler in 2003.

The pulpit is carved alabaster, and was given by a former Rector, and the Font, also in alabaster was given in memory of Admiral Long of Blendworth Lodge who died in 1893

The tower contains a bell cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry in 1898, and contains a clock with chimes as a memorial to those who fell in the 1914-18 war, and as a thanksgiving to God for those who returned.

To commemorate the centenary of the church in 1951, an addition to the organ was given by Major A.F.Clarke-Jervoise, J.P, High Sheriff of Hampshire in the form of a detachable keyboard.

A Bas relief of St Thomas given by the former Rector Reverend Ewen Pinsent and his family in memory of their son, Thomas who died of leukaemia, can be found in the organ loft. Thomas’ younger brother, Matthew, became the famous international Olympic rower.

Further refurbishment has included the south aisle with removal of some of the pews to allow more space for a welcome area inside the door of the church and a fully installed under pew heating system. Re-carpeting of the whole church has brought a more unified and warmer atmosphere to the building.

How to find Holy Trinity
Blendworth Lane,  Horndean. PO8 0AB

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